Source: Arne Dietrich, 2004

Lately, I’ve been reading a lot about how creativity and innovation happens. In 2004, Arne Dietrich wrote a paper on creativity from a brain and neuroscience POV. In this paper, it is proposed that there are four basic types of creative insights, each mediated by a distinctive neural circuit and its corresponding brain activity. The study demonstrates creativity as being either emotionally or cognitively based, while also being deliberate or spontaneous.

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Source: HBR, Michael E. Porter and Mark R. Kramer, 2011

Simplistically, shared value is the notion that what is good for business and what is good for society should not be mutually exclusive, and that businesses that address societal needs create a long-term advantage. The central premise behind creating shared value is that the competitiveness of a company and the health of the communities around it are mutually dependent. For example, it is in the interest of chocolate companies to ensure that the future of cocoa production is sustainable (otherwise they will put themselves out of business by reducing the ability to produce cocoa), which also serves social needs for protecting our environment and people at the source. There is no business to be done on a dead planet or when people don’t have basic means, so it’s worthwhile for companies to share business value with society.

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via Hubspot

This framework is all about sizing the market opportunity and requires market research ahead of time to define. There are varying methodologies to define these different levels of market size, depending on the need of the business, but overarching the principles are below:

  • Total Addressable Market — What is the total market potential of EVERYONE we can reach? (TAM)
  • Serviceable Available Market — What is the portion of the market you can acquire based on your business model? (SAM)
  • Serviceable Obtainable Market — How many of who we can reach we will realistically capture? (SOM)

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Source: Blue Ocean Strategy

The aim of this model is to avoid battling competition head-on, instead opting for finding the disruption customers are clamoring for and is yet to be created by the industry. This is great as a workshop exercise in break-out groups during annual planning cycles. Or this framework could be used in the early days of establishing a start-up. Even pricing strategy could benefit from an ERRC approach.

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Source: Inspired by David Aaker’s brand architecture spectrum

Here is a simple visualization of the brand architecture spectrum. Brand architecture is about the relationships between the brands in a portfolio. On one end of the spectrum is the master, parent brand, which leads the portfolio of brands and in vision and equities. And on the other end is a stand alone sub-brand (or product brand) when it has little or no assocation with the parent. There are versions of this model that go into more forensic detail about all the reltionship options that exist in between these two poles. But in it’s more simplistic form, the relationships options in between usually have some form of either sub-branding or endorsed branding.

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Via The London Strategy Unit

This is a morbidly wonderful projective technique for playing with what people think of your brand — after all, brands are built in the mind. By framing your brand posthumously, you are able to get working session participants thinking less rationally, which is a bit more like consumers. Plus, isn’t it fun to kill your brand just for a meeting.

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Source: Felix Heibeck https://bit.ly/3sEytFD

Desirability, feasibility, and viability are the go-to principles of design thinking. While these three tenets of design thinking are deeply entrenched, for the continued life on this planet we need to shift this view from focusing on the needs of users and customers, while also taking into account the ecology of our living planet. Design thinking needs to shift from a human-centric lens to a bio-centric one, this way we are bringing what is sustainable into view early on in our vision process when creating experiences and products. This means adopting a cradle-to-cradle mentality of regenerative and cyclical usage for materials that take into account the waste footprint before, during, and after use.

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Source: Kim Scott, Radical Candor, 2017

This framework comes to us from Kim Scott’s book called Radical Candor, where she defines a management/working style that combines caring deeply with challenging directly. In her book, she makes the case for avoiding being overly harsh, sparing someone’s feelings, or being passively insincere — in favor of honesty that exists to change what is not working, and is motivated by caring.

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Source: Adapted from The JWT Planning Tools

Things can get muddled when defining a brand platform and a campaign idea, leaving even the most seasoned marketers asking what’s the difference between the two? This framework is a brutally simple way to show that brand platforms operate at the marketing level, providing the vision, while the campaign is where marketing ideas come to life as comms.

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The Framework Bank

The Framework Bank

Strategic folks love a good framework. So here is a collection of them: brand, innovation, campaign, design, mgmt, etc. Want to contribute? Tweet @JenBonhomme